Archive for the 'contemporary stained glass' category

Return to blog homepage

Older Entries

When offered the opportunity of designing a widow featuring dolphins, I admit I hesitated. Could I achieve something fresh here? Is it even possible to avoid cliche with this subject matter? The clients had something quite specific in mind, an image of a window found on the internet, one which was quite well designed in fact. Well, I thoroughly enjoyed the process and I think I managed to make something worthwhile: you be the judge.

‚Äč

Dolphin windowDolphin window

As I mentioned in my previous blog, the studio has been insanely busy over the past 6x months or so. Yesterday I installed the last of this year's projects, a three-panelled bathroom window for a luxurious private residence in Sutton, NSW.

The beautiful finishes throughout the home include recycled timber, brick paving for interior flooring along with sanded beech in a herringbone pattern, cor-ten steel balustrades seen in the image above and exposed rammed earth walls. The client is a design consultant and approached me with the idea of making a window comprising slices of agate. But she also had an entirely different concept of a mechanical grid made up of a multitude of colours.

I suggested combining these two elements as a design solution: the organic crystal forms are thus suspended in the geometric grid.

Bathroom window, private residence Sutton NSWBathroom window, private residence Sutton NSW

Exterior view of the agate windowExterior view of the agate window

Interior view of the agate window showing the bathroomInterior view of the agate window showing the bathroom

Filed under: | View Comments

New Installations

19 Nov 2016

Over the past 6 months my major commission has been two double window sets for St Peter's Anglican Church in East Maitland. With the assistance of Ron Jensen of Heritage Stained Glass, New Lambton, his off-sider Anthony and my assistant Hannah, we got these four windows and their quatrafoils installed over four days last week.

Two weeks prior to this installation, I completed the installation of a pair of stained glass door panels to a family vault in Frenchs Forrest Cemetery.

The brief for this project called for renderings of the Coat of Arms of the City of Lombardo, Italy and St Aloysius School in North Sydney. I took as my lead the bold deco design of the facade, echoing the bronze, brass and black granite.

St Luke Anglican BuchananSt Luke Anglican Buchanan

St Barnabas East MaitlandSt Barnabas East Maitland

Excavating the old glassExcavating the old glass

Scaffold tower at St Peter'sScaffold tower at St Peter's

Knuckle boom hoist for the external workKnuckle boom hoist for the external work

Facade of the Bartalotta cryptFacade of the Bartalotta crypt

The bronze & stained glass doorsThe bronze & stained glass doors

Left hand panel: LombardoLeft hand panel: Lombardo

CMS added image

Right hand panel: AloysiusRight hand panel: Aloysius

Filed under: | View Comments

Just opened last weekend: an exhibition of 5x of my works alongside a collection of pastel drawings and prints by Bek Rice featuring the local Glebe and Leichhardt areas. The link is the vibrancy and colour of the works, echoing the vibe of the area.

The Director of Glass Artists Gallery, Maureen Cahill recently moved the glass exhibition area up one level while maintaining the street level as an exhibition space available for hire. She will also curate occasional shows there herself (such as this one).

Sunday 6th July saw a good number of people arrive at the gallery to join in conversation with myself and Bek Rice. The Director Maureen Cahill firstly introduced us both and explained some historical associations and the rationale for the show. This was Bek's first time speaking to a group about her work but she handled it with aplomb, clearly demonstrating the passion that she has for her practice.

After some questions I took the floor with a brief background to my life as an artist, followed by some detailed analysis of the works on display and the making processes involved. There was some lively discusion, with some interesting questions and comments form the audience- many of whom were of course themselves arts practitioners.

Gauge/Glass Artists GalleryGauge/Glass Artists Gallery

Two large free-standing worksTwo large free-standing works

Diamond on the Wall No2Diamond on the Wall No2

Derived PieceDerived Piece

Gallery viewGallery view

Bek Rice discussing her workBek Rice discussing her work

Audience at the Artists TalksAudience at the Artists Talks

Filed under: | View Comments

Earlier last year I had the opportunity to visit the Scallabrini Village @ Austral in Sydney's south west. The village is a retirement centre catering in particular to the Italian community. The chapel appears to have been built in the 1960s or '70s and has some very fine stained glass by Anzolo Fuga, who it seems was a glass designer for Arte Vetraria Muranese, Italy. The windows are very distinctive and unlike anything I have seen in Australia- perhaps the closest would be the work of Jean Orval in Victoria. Like much of Orval's work, Anzolo's windows still have a freshness today

Chapel windows, LHSChapel windows, LHS

Chapel windows RHSChapel windows RHS

Detail from the LHSDetail from the LHS

Detail from the LHSDetail from the LHS

Detail from the LHSDetail from the LHS

Detail from the RHSDetail from the RHS

Detail from the RHSDetail from the RHS

Artist's signatureArtist's signature

Detail from the RHSDetail from the RHS

Filed under: | View Comments

With Light in Mind

14 Dec 2013

Greville Wilton, of Golden Wattle Studios in Glen Innes, NSW, would be the first to declare he is no artist. He is an excellent leadlighter. But making that statement denies the brilliant design skills on display in this exhibition. Together with Tanja Robertson-Cunninghame they make an awesome team. This whole exhibition at Maitland Regional Art Gallery is predicated on close collaboration. Tanja has produced an enormous body of exciting new canvases referencing the Australian modernist abstract canon and it is these which form the basis of the 16x stained glass panels on display.

Greville's design and engineering skills also came to the fore in setting up the show and making full use of the space available in the atrium of the gallery's main entrance. A welded steel frame is attached to the ceiling and from this the stained glass works are suspended on steel cable. Each panel is cleverly framed in a welded steel frame comprising a fin of metal into which the lead came is inserted: this provides an essential foil of darkness to separate the glass from its background and allow it to live in the ambient space.

I particularly enjoyed the placement of stained glass panels in the stairwell and installed over the glass of the back exit. And the surprise pieces in the balconies also delight the senses. All in all a great exhibition, one which should raise the profile of Golden Wattle immensely but also go a long way to furthering the somewhat marginalised artform of contemporary stained glass.

Glass and Paintings at Maitland RegionalGlass and Paintings at Maitland Regional

From the balconyFrom the balcony

View from the first floorView from the first floor

The stairwellThe stairwell

Installed in the back doorInstalled in the back door

A horizontal piece with rondelsA horizontal piece with rondels

A vertical pieceA vertical piece

Abstract canvas incorporating butterfliesAbstract canvas incorporating butterflies

Turkish by Robertson-CunninghameTurkish by Robertson-Cunninghame

Set of paintingsSet of paintings

Filed under: | View Comments

Two New Works

24 Oct 2013

I've been extremely busy over the last few months, undertaking a specialist cleaning project and assessment of stained glass at St Mary's Catholic Church, Concord, pushing on with a new window for St Edmund's Anglican Church in Maroubra and developing a design for St Andrew's Presbyterian Church in Bowral (see progress shots in my ABOUT page) However during this time I have also managed to complete two new abstract stained glass panels.

Splash Dance is a richly textured work, as much for the play of texture as the necessity for privacy: it is window to a toilet which backs onto a courtyard used for entertaining. And naturally some ventilation is also required. The stained glass replaces a pair of double-hung timber sashes which had a fixed vent installed at the top. I proposed to the client dispensing with the vent and instead incorporating expanded metal mesh within the artwork. This idea appealed immensely and allowed me to 'give vent' to my desire for found object: there are antique pieces of Meccano, metal mesh and a stainless steel drainage sieve leaded into the work which all provided a degree of ventilation as well as playfulness. The residence is located in Darlinghurst, NSW.

Lyrical WorkLyrical Work

Also relying heavily on found object, Lyrical Work is to be installed early November in a front door of a residential extension at Weston Creek, ACT. No ventilation holes in this piece, as outside temperatures around Canberra can fall below freezing at times, but a similar need for privacy and so much use of heavily textured and obscured or 'mechanical' glasses.

The lyricism of this piece is derived from classical string and piano works- Vaughan Williams, Debussy, Liszt and (a particular request of the client's) Scottish Airs. So as the design developed I found a need to incorporate floral and naturalistic elements: the painted acanthus leaf from a Church window, a treasured remnant of one of my painted rondels, some pressed "flannel flower" glass. Also there is quite a lot of iridised glass employed to enliven the work at night. A similar approach was used in Splash Dance, with the iridising both inside and outside.

Nov 10th: I've just returned to Sydney after installing the door panel yesterday. While the install didn't quite go according to plan, I have to say I'm very impressed with the quality of the timber joinery by Gino Monteleone of Select Custom Joinery in Hall, ACT. In fact the whole extension is quite impressive in its detail and finish. Its being built by Canberra firm ABC Constructions

Splash DanceSplash Dance

Filed under: | View Comments

Wamboin Entryway

05 May 2013

As well as window to the guest bathroom, fronting the approach to the new house, Ruth and Steve Lambert also commissioned me to design a three-light door and sidelights to the entrance. Ruth wanted soemthing with high impact, providing a real 'wow' factor, nd chose Lambert's mouthblown glass to fill the sidelights.

Thanks to Greg Piper for the beaut photos: I asked him to stop by on the return journey from the Ausglass Conference in Wagga Wagga where he delivered a paper on the merits of good photography. Wamboin is located between Canberra and Bungendore: from Wagga you can drive across country through Queanbeyan. Greg has been photographing my installations for many years now; I'm extremely happy with his professional approach and his attention to detail. He's prepared to go the extra distance to produce the best results.

While this is very much an abstract work there is substantial reference to landscape, in particular the bush surrounding the house and the wider environment. The interesting angles of the architecture and the architectural finishes were also considered in the design of the glass for the door.

Top panelTop panel

Centre panelCentre panel

Bottom panelBottom panel

View from kitchenView from kitchen

Close upClose up

Detail of sidelightDetail of sidelight

Overall shotOverall shot

view of the houseview of the house

Filed under: | View Comments

Lyrical Landscape

18 Feb 2013

Have just installed a new contemporary commission for a private residence at Wamboin in NSW (between Bungendore and Canberra). I installed the front door and sidelights late last year; this is the bathroom window. The images below show, from left to right, the full-size charcoal cartoon, the glass all cut and laid out over lights and the installed window. Extensive use has been made of Lambert's mouthblown glass, the same glass that was installed in the sidelights (laminated to comply with Australian building codes) and used in the front door stained glass panels.

The artwork describes my wonderful two hour walk through the 600acre property where the house is nestled, facing west, and also refers to the music of Australian composers
Peter Sculthorpe and John Antil. Having completed the work for the front
door a few weeks prior I needed to steep myself in a musical response to the Australian
landscape for inspiration in creating the imagery for this window.

New bathroom window at WamboinNew bathroom window at Wamboin

Charcoal cartoon for the windowCharcoal cartoon for the window

CMS added image

CMS added imageCMS added image

CMS added image

CMS added image

CMS added image

CMS added imageCMS added image

Filed under: | View Comments

Recent Installations

02 Sep 2012

Several new commissions feature in this blog: kitchen windows in Surry Hills, an entryway in a lovely old home at Milson's Point on Sydney's Lower North Shore and a private chapel at a country property near Cessnock.

Regular readers of this website might remember images of this project in Milson's Point underway on my ABOUT page, showing the original door as a solid timber door with a fanlight above. The commission called for the replacement of the 4x timber infill panels with glass, which entailed quite a bit of onsite work. The photos were taken just as I'd completed the installation but prior to the stripping and painting of the timberwork. I used a collection of found bevels from old leadlights and while there was a need to respect the original fanlight I was asked to provide something more upbeat and contemporary.

The two photos above show a pair of windows installed as highlights over the back entrance of a Surry Hills residence just three weeks ago. I had a lot of fun with this design; it is intended to pay respect to an existing traditional leadlight in the adjacent bathroom and also takes its cue from the black and white rectangular tiling in the kitchen. Here again I've used some 'found object': an interesting bevel out of an old leadlight and some cast jewels and rondels.

This window was a really enjoyable project to work on. Commissioned by Liz Mullinar, Director of Heal for Life the window sits above a door leading from the bedroom to a chapel and was intended as an inspirational piece for private devotion. The house is situated on a beautiful property in the Quarrabolong Valley near Cessnock, about 2 hours north of Sydney, with panoramic views of rolling hills, farmland and distant bushy ranges.

New door panelsNew door panels

The main panelsThe main panels

The two lower panelsThe two lower panels

The full entrywayThe full entryway

Pair of highlights in Surry HillsPair of highlights in Surry Hills

Looking out to the gardenLooking out to the garden

Highlight to a private chapelHighlight to a private chapel

Filed under: | View Comments

Subscribe

Subscribe by RSS

The Latest Happenings in my World

This blog is where you will find my latest news. It can range from posting images of progress of the current commission to art crit to political or social commentary, both national and international. Anything, basically, that's commanding my attention and I feel is worth sharing with you, my reader. Enjoy. My previous blog can be found at jeffreyhamilton.blogspot.com