Wall Works

The wall works grew out of a need to address the gallery wall: making stained glass artworks for a situation where there is no window; in effect, creating a window in the wall. By choosing glass which responds to reflected light rather than transmitted light and backing the work with white card one can create a luminous work of art. Light boxes are of course another way of achieving this and can be very successful but require a lot more logistics. To date I've not ventured down this path.

Fire and Light

Fire and Light

  • 128cm x 128cm
  • 2007

Created for the North Shore Craft Group's 30th Annual Exhibition. The Group invited all former members to exhibit for this Anniversary Exhibition at Pymble Town Hall.

Their "Special Exhibit" theme was "All That Glitters", which appealed enormously. I bought some new iridised Uruborus Glass and had some mechanical rolled glasses sent away to be silvered, with wonderful results.

Flickers in the Grey Morass

Flickers in the Grey Morass

  • 1997
  • 84cm dia.

One of a series of 3x wall works set into patinated MDF frames.

Some experimentation going on with glass paint in all three of these works.

Containment

Containment

  • 1997
  • 84cm dia.

One of a series of 3x wall works set into patinated MDF frames.

The paint in the central cream coloured area has been applied with a painting knife- same in the large yellow area in Rhythm and Blues.

Rhythm and Blues

Rhythm and Blues

  • 1997
  • 84cm dia.

One of a series of 3x wall works set into patinated MDF frames.

You will see I am also continuing my use of various thicknesses of lead lines, juxtaposing 15mm wide leads with 5mm for example, emphasising the sense of dynamic movement throughout the artwork and making it more of a drawing or a painting.

Further Afield

Further Afield

  • 1990
  • 173cm x 128cm

The second in a series of 3x very large wall works, these ones framed in painted timber using gold lustre on a red ground.

The first work in this series, "Unknown Fields", made in 1988, was a real departure for me insofar as I allowed the design to evolve from within to determine the final shape. Unfortunately that piece was damaged in an exhibition.

Third Field Experiment

Third Field Experiment

  • 1991/92
  • 161cm x 130cm

Each of these works, being so large, weigh around 35-40kg and so require a solid wall and a substantial hanging system. Both No.2 and No.3 in this series are on long-term display at the new Leichhardt premises of Australian Stained Glass Supplies.

The Piece

The Piece

  • 1992
  • 56cm dia.

Lots of experimentation here with juxtaposing different sized leads, carving lead, changing lead sizes in one line and blending them and also an opportunity to use up all my special little treasured bits. The aim here was to be as detailed and intricate as possible while still retaining vigorous energy and light-heartedness. A busy humming of energy.

The Piece was made for the Ausglass Canberra Conference Members' Exhibition in Drill Hall Gallery, ANU 1993.

Diamond on the Wall

Diamond on the Wall

  • circa 1990
  • approx. 45cm x 45cm

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Wings of DEsire

Wings of Desire

  • circa 1997
  • approx. 30cm x 30cm

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Diamond on the Wall: Territory

Diamond No. 3: Territory

  • circa 1994
  • approx. 45cm x 45cm

Inspired by the colours of outback Australia this piece was made for a Craft Council exhibition in the Northern Territory, but was not selected. It later sold through a wonderful gallery no longer with us: Australian Craftworks in the old police cells at The Rocks.

Breath of Compassion

Breath of Compassion

  • 2011
  • 2.1m x 2.1m

This large work is actually a residential commission. It provides the focal point to an apartment in Chippendale owned by two lovely men, Paul and Michael, and was installed just in time for Paul's 50th birthday.

It has a commanding presence, catching the sun from the rooftop courtyard and splashing it around the stairwell. I've used a lot of iridised and silvered glasses specifically with this in mind.

The geometry of the work was generated by laying two squares one over the other: a union of two persons, to make a third shape, one which is known throughout Islamic art as "the Breath of Compassion" when seen in a matrix of multiples.

The pulsating energy of the Universe breathes though this work.

Breath of Compassion detail

Breath of Compassion
[detail]

  • 2011

Building and installing this work was quite an exercise. This close up not only shows you some of the beautiful glass but also the way I've reinforced the whole piece with steel bars soldered onto the surface of the lead, right over the face of the horizontal zinc joiners, tying the three separate panels together and locking them into the frame.